STABLE program helps with transport - WAOW - Newsline 9, Wausau News, Weather, Sports

STABLE program helps with transport

Posted:
Jeannie Matsche teaches STABLE to other healthcare providers.  She wrote the grant in 2005. Jeannie Matsche teaches STABLE to other healthcare providers. She wrote the grant in 2005.
Staff from Good Samaritan Hospital in Merrill learn the STABLE program. Staff from Good Samaritan Hospital in Merrill learn the STABLE program.
STABLE resources are put in outlying hospitals for staff. STABLE resources are put in outlying hospitals for staff.
Babies must be stable for transport. Babies must be stable for transport.

by Pam Warnke

MARSHFIELD (WAOW)-- When the neonatal transport team from St. Joseph's Children's Hospital arrives at an outlying hospital to pick up a baby, they put a lot of faith in the staff there.

Time is of the essence in these critical situations, and babies must be stable to be taken by ground or by air.

"We used to be kind of a pickup and run service.  They'd call, we'd go, we'd get the kid in the ambulance and come back and frequently there were problems with the baby on the way back," said Dr. Jody Gross.

That's why St. Joseph's Children's Hospital implemented a program called STABLE several years ago.

"The neumonic stands for sugar and safe care, temperature, artificial airway, blood pressure, labwork and emotional support," said Registered Nurse Jeannie Matsche.

The national program gives staff a systematic approach to the stabilization of a baby needing transport to a special care facility, after they're rescuitated, but before transport.

Registered Nurse Jeannie Matsche teaches staff at Good Samaritian Hospital in Merrill the STABLE program.

Machie wrote the grant in 2005 that allowed STABLE materials to be put into place at outreach hospitals.  She heads to referral hospitals in person for training.

When the transport team arrives on site to pick up a baby, the STABLE program helps them move forward with care instead of wasting time overlaping or redoing.

Matsche said, "We know when we walk in there that the infant is probably going to have an iv with the appropriate fluids running.  We don't have to worry that they were given too much fluids.  We know that they've done the steps for helping them breathe, that they've done all of the right lab work so that when we get there most of it is already done, and we can examine the baby--do a quick check--make any fine tuning that needs to be done."

Online Reporter: Pam Warnke

 

Powered by Frankly