The Latest: Milwaukee mayor calls ruling 'sad day' - WAOW - Newsline 9, Wausau News, Weather, Sports

The Latest: Milwaukee mayor calls ruling 'sad day'

Posted:
MADISON, Wis. (AP) -

The Latest on the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling striking down Milwaukee's residency requirements (all times local):

   10:55 a.m.

Gov. Scott Walker's spokesman is praising a Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that bars Milwaukee from requiring its workers to live in the city.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson calls Thursday's decision "a big win for individual freedom." He also says it's a win for Milwaukee "as they have a larger base to attract employees."

But Democratic Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett doesn't see it that way. Barrett says he is angry with the decision, calling it a "sad day" both for the city and the state.

Barrett says the Supreme Court and Republicans who control state government are not respecting a city requirement that's been in place for more than 75 years.


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   10:40 a.m.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is blasting a Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling, calling it a "sad day" for his city and the state.

The court ruled Thursday that Milwaukee can no longer require police, firefighters, teachers and other public employees to live within the city's boundaries.

The conservative-controlled court broke along ideological lines in upholding the law passed by the Republican-controlled Legislature and signed by Gov. Scott Walker.

The Democratic Barrett says the ruling is the result of "one party rule" in Wisconsin and "political gamesmanship."

Barrett says "This is not the Wisconsin that we have lived in before and the people of this state have to recognize the dangers when you have one party that controls every level of power."


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   9:25 a.m.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling striking down Milwaukee's requirement that public workers live within the city boundaries applies only to that city.

That's because its residency requirement was uniquely tailored to the city. There were more than 100 other cities across the state with some form of residency requirement before the state Legislature passed a law in 2013 disallowing such restrictions.

Curt Witynski with the Wisconsin League of Municipalities said Thursday all of them made changes to comply with the law after it passed.

But Milwaukee fought a legal challenge brought by unions representing police and firefighters. The city has not been enforcing the residency requirement while the case has been pending.


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   7:58 a.m.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court says Milwaukee can no longer enforce its residency requirement.

The court ruled 5-2 on Thursday that Milwaukee's long-standing requirement that its public workers also live in the city is subject to a state law barring such restrictions.

The ruling Thursday reverses a state appeals court decision that said Milwaukee's residency requirement could not be superseded by a state law passed in 2013.

That law prohibits local governments from enforcing any residency requirements beyond requiring police and firefighters to live within 15 miles of the government unit.

Milwaukee has required its more than 7,000 employees to live within the city boundaries for more than 75 years.

The lawsuit challenging Milwaukee's refusal to abide by the law was brought by unions representing police and firefighters in the city.

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