The Latest: Trumps dance with military members at final ball - WAOW - Newsline 9, Wausau News, Weather, Sports

The Latest: Trumps dance with military members at final ball

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WASHINGTON (AP) -

The Latest on Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States (all times EST):

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States (all times EST):

11:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are taking part in a traditional dance and cake-cutting with members of the U.S. military.

The newly sworn-in president is dancing with U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Catherine Cartmell of Newport, Rhode Island.

Mrs. Trump is dancing with U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jose A. Medina of Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Vice President Mike Pence and his wife, Karen, also are dancing with members of the military.

The Trumps and Pences are also participating in the military's traditional cake cutting to honor the sacrifice and service of its members. The cake is cut with a saber.

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11:10

First lady Melania Trump thanked the members of the armed services at the third and final inaugural ball she and President Donald Trump attended Friday.

She said, "Thank you all for your service. I'm honored to be your first lady."

The first couple then danced to "I Will Always Love You."

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10:10 p.m.

President Donald Trump asked the crowd at the second of three inaugural balls he's attending whether he should "keep the Twitter going?"

The crowd roared in apparent approval.

Trump said his all-hours tweeting to his more than 20 million followers is "a way of bypassing dishonest media."

He spoke with first lady Melania Trump by his side. She wore an ivory column gown.

"Now," he added, "the fun begins."

The first couple again danced to "My Way."

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9:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump and his wife, Melania, are dancing at the first of three inaugural balls they'll attend Friday night.

Trump says his first day as commander-in-chief was great.

Trump says, "People that weren't so nice to me were saying that we did a really good job today." He adds, "It's like God was looking down on us."

They are dancing to "My Way," and they have been joined by Vice President Mike Pence and his wife, Susan, as well as Trump family members.

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9:30 p.m.

After eight years, Barack Obama had to wait a little bit longer to start his post-presidential relaxation.

The plane taking the Obama family from Washington to the California desert Friday was delayed then diverted because of bad weather.

Officials say the Obamas hovered for about 40 minutes over Palm Springs International Airport, where gawkers and photographers had gathered to catch a glimpse of them. It was eventually diverted to March Air Reserve Base about 60 miles to the west, where it landed at about 5:45 p.m., about an hour after it was expected.

Obama left Washington after attending President Donald Trump's morning inauguration.

The first family had sought a sunny vacation as they left cold capital, but Southern California is being doused by a series of storms.

4:35 p.m.

At least one vehicle is on fire as protests escalate in downtown Washington.

A plume of thick black smoke is billowing from a vandalized limousine at the corner of K and 13th Streets Northwest. Riot police are working to remove people from the area, which is just a few blocks from President Donald Trump's inaugural parade route.

Police are using what appear to be flash bang grenades to help control the scene.

The activity follows a brief period of relative calm in the area.

4:25 p.m.

The leader of Taiwan's delegation to the U.S. presidential inauguration has dismissed China's strong objections to his attendance as "small-minded."

Former Premier Yu Shyi-kun says: "It's hard to believe that a country with 5,000 years of history and its glorious background is so focused on this. It just shows how petty they are."

Yu was interviewed by The Associated Press after watching Trump's swearing-in. He says he had a good seat, directly in front of the ceremony at the Capitol.

The U.S. has no formal relations with self-governing Taiwan in deference to China, which claims the island as its own. However, the two maintain robust informal ties. China is concerned that President Donald Trump could seek to redefine relations between Beijing, Taipei and Washington.

4:20 p.m.

President Donald Trump has stepped out of his limousine to briefly walk along the inaugural parade route.

Trump was joined by the new first lady Melania Trump and their 10-year-old son, Barron.

The president rode in his official vehicle for the first portion of the parade and stepped out in front of FBI headquarters along Pennsylvania Avenue.

He got back in his vehicle just before the motorcade drove past his newly opened hotel in the Old Post Office building.

4:05 p.m

President Donald Trump is making his way down Constitution Avenue with a military escort as his inauguration parade begins in Washington.

The president will review the parade from a viewing stand near the White House.

He and first lady Melania Trump are riding in the presidential limousine nicknamed "The Beast."

Trump is being cheered by supporters as his car passes.

Others are shouting "Media sucks" while a group of protesters chants, "Not my president, not my president."

3:50 p.m.

Military bands representing all the service branches are playing and marching outside the Capitol, signaling the start of the inaugural parade.

Police officers on motorcycles are following closely behind as the parade participants begin the slow trek down Constitution Avenue.

Hundreds of police officers have lined both sides of the street. Service members are also standing at attention on both sides.

There are only a few onlookers along the first couple of blocks but the crowds appear to grow as the parade approaches the National Mall.

3:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump -- in brief remarks at his inaugural lunch at the Capitol -- says he was honored that Hillary Clinton, his rival in the White House race, came to the event.

The bipartisan crowd of lawmakers and other dignitaries gave Clinton a standing ovation after Trump asked her to rise.

Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, sat with members of Trump's family at the event.

Trump ended by saying he has "a lot of respect for those two people."

3:10 p.m.

Far fewer people were at President Donald Trump's inauguration than attended President Barack Obama's first swearing-in eight years ago.

Photos of the National Mall from Obama's inauguration in January 2009 show a teeming crowd stretching from the West Front of the Capitol all the way to the Washington Monument.

Photos taken from the same position on Friday show large swaths of empty space on the Mall.

Thin crowds and semi-empty bleachers also dotted the inaugural parade route.

Hotels across the District of Columbia reported vacancies, a rarity for an event as large as a presidential inauguration.

And ridership on the Washington's Metro system didn't match that of recent inaugurations.

3:05 p.m.

Partisan rivalries in Washington appear to have eased for at least one meal.

President Donald Trump is dining with a group of Republican and Democratic lawmakers in the Capitol shortly after his inauguration.

Trump has spent much of the lunch in animated conversation with Senate Democratic leader Charles Schumer, who's threatened to slow votes on some Cabinet nominees.

West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, a moderate Democrat, walked up to the head table at one point to join the conversation.

Trump's rival in the presidential election, Democrat Hillary Clinton, sat with Trump family members.

3 p.m.

The Washington Post is reporting that one of its video journalists was taken to the ground by police while recording video of the large protest going on in downtown Washington.

2:40 p.m.

The large Inauguration Day demonstration in downtown Washington is taking place at the edge of a zone where vehicles aren't allowed to drive Friday.

So motorists are getting caught in the confrontation between protesters and police.

Some are trying to turn around, but in at least one place, newspaper boxes and trash cans were overturned in the street and a fire set.

2:25 p.m.

District of Columbia police are using tear gas canisters in a confrontation with protesters in downtown Washington.

Some people are being treated for exposure to tear gas and some people are vomiting.

Police have blocked off both sides of the street. Protesters were throwing bricks and concrete at police. One protester wearing a mask smashed a bank window. And demonstrators have blocked streets with newspaper boxes.

Another protester was standing on a mailbox and waving a rainbow flag.

Police are in riot gear, and that includes helmets and body shields.

Protesters have blocked streets with newspaper boxes.

2:05 p.m.

Police in the nation's capital have again clashed with demonstrators -- this time with a larger group than earlier in the day.

Well over 1,000 protesters are in the streets of downtown Washington for a confrontation with police. Authorities are again using pepper spray, and some demonstrators appear to have difficulty breathing.

Some in the crowd are throwing cups, water bottles and objects -- including chunks of concrete. Some protesters have rolled large steel trash cans at police.

2 p.m.

Rick Perry --the former Texas governor who's in line to be energy secretary -- was seen chewing gum and blowing bubbles as a rabbi spoke during Donald Trump's inauguration.

That image has drawn lots of attention on social media.

It comes on the heels of Perry's comments at his confirmation hearing Thursday when he told Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., that he enjoyed meeting him at Franken's Senate office. And Perry then said: "I hope you are as much fun on that dais as you were on your couch."

Franken, a former comedian, paused for effect as Perry asked to rephrase. "Please," Franken said.

1:50 p.m.

President Donald Trump has arrived at the inaugural luncheon in Capitol -- and he immediately walked to Hillary Clinton's table and shook the hand of the defeated Democratic nominee.

The menu features three courses and includes Maine lobster, Virginia beef and shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico.

Later, Republican and Democratic congressional leaders will give toasts.

1:45 p.m.

"Unbelievably humbling."

That's what President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, says after watching the inauguration not far from where the new president took the oath of office.

Lewandowski says this about Trump: "I knew a winner when I saw one. I don't think anybody realized how angry the country was with Washington."

1:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump has formally nominated his Cabinet.

Trump made his nominations official just after he took office. He signed a series of documents in an ornate room steps from the Senate floor.

The president distributed pens to congressional leaders according to whether they liked his choices. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, for instance, received the pen that Trump used to nominate Elaine Chao, McConnell's wife, to be transportation secretary.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi jokingly objected to getting a pen used to nominate Tom Price to be health secretary. At that point, House Speaker Paul Ryan chimed in, "I'll take it."

After nominating Mike Pompeo to head the CIA, Trump said he'd heard Pompeo would be confirmed "momentarily."

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer piped up: "It depends what you mean by momentarily."

1:35 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is attending President Donald Trump's inaugural luncheon at the Capitol.

Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, posed for pictures with a bipartisan group of attendees. Republican Trump defeated Democrat Clinton in the November election.

Former President Jimmy Carter is also at the luncheon.

Also attending are members of Congress, Supreme Court justices and some of Trump's Cabinet picks.

1:33 p.m.

Far fewer riders used Washington's Metro system on Friday than for previous inaugurations.

As of 11 a.m., there were 193,000 trips taken, according to the transit service's Twitter account.

At the same hour eight years ago for President Barack Obama's first inaugural, there had been 513,000 trips. Four years later, there were 317,000 for Obama's second inauguration.

There were 197,000 at 11 a.m. in 2005 for President George W. Bush's second inauguration.

The Metro system also posted that only two parking lots at stations were more than 60 percent full.

1:30 p.m.

Donald Trump isn't wasting much time before signing some presidential paperwork.

Press secretary Sean Spicer says on Twitter that the new president is signing formal nominations for each of his Cabinet picks and other members of the new administration.

He's also signing a proclamation for a National Day of Patriotism and legislation that clears the way for retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to run the Pentagon, if confirmed by the Senate.

Trump signed the documents as he was surrounded by lawmakers and his family members, and he handed out ceremonial pens to members of Congress.

1:24 p.m.

Former President Barack Obama is thanking supporters before he departs for a vacation in California -- saying that they "proved the power of hope."

Obama was joined by former first lady Michelle Obama at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. They took a helicopter there from the Capitol following President Donald Trump's swearing-in ceremonies.

The outgoing president says he and his wife have sometimes been the "voice out front" but his push for changes in the country that began with his 2008 presidential campaign "has never been about us. It has always been about you."

1:20 p.m.

Police in the nation's capital says two officers were injured and some police cars were damaged by protesters.

Police say officers used pepper spray to subdue protesters who were damaging cars, setting fires and destroying the property of businesses.

Police say they made "numerous arrests" and that an unspecified number of demonstrators have been charged with rioting.

1:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump has signed legislation that clears the way for his defense secretary pick -- retired Marine Gen. James Mattis -- to run the Pentagon, if confirmed by the Senate.

A vote on Mattis is expected Friday.

There's a law that bars former service members who've been out of uniform for less than seven years from holding the top Pentagon job. The restriction is meant to preserve civilian control of the military.

The measure signed by Trump soon after his took office grants Mattis a one-time exception.

Congress last allowed an exception to the law in 1950 for George Marshall, a former five-star Army general.

1:10 p.m.

President Donald Trump is pledging to eliminate President Barack Obama's environmental regulations. That includes Obama's plan to address climate change.

As Trump was giving his inaugural address, the White House website listed several actions Trump will take to cancel "harmful and unnecessary policies." Among them are Obama's climate action plan and a clean water rule imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The climate plan is intended as a broad-based strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. The plan includes a series of rules that limit carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants.

The water rule is intended to protect smaller streams, tributaries and wetlands from development.

1 p.m.

Randy Showalter says he felt inspired as he stood on the National Mall and listened to Donald Trump's inauguration speech.

Showalter is a 36-year-old diesel mechanic and father of five from Mount Solon, Virginia. He'd never attended an inauguration before and says Trump spoke to him in a way that no other politician has.

Showalter says: "I feel like there's an American pride that I've never felt, honestly, in my life."

He was wearing the Trump campaign's signature red "Make America Great Again" hat, says he's optimistic about Trump's pledges to improve the economy and create working-class jobs.

Showalter says the billionaire "understands that the working man is what makes him rich. He understands what a real blue-collar working man is."

12:55 p.m.

The prime minister of Japan -- one of America's closest allies -- is congratulating Donald Trump on his inauguration and says he wants to strengthen the "unwavering" ties between the two nations.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe issued his statement minutes after Trump took the oath of office as the 45th U.S. president.

Abe says he looks forward to meeting Trump again "at the earliest possible occasion" to send a message to the world on the importance of the Japan-U.S. alliance.

Japanese media have reported Abe may visit the U.S. in late January.

12:50 p.m.

Foreign ministers from Poland and Lithuania say they're looking forward to working constructively with the Trump administration. They're playing down anxieties that President Donald Trump's pro-Russian views could hurt the region's interests.

Witold Waszczykowski says Poland is hopeful about the U.S. change. He's noting with some bitterness that the region felt neglected by former President Barack Obama in the early years of his administration.

Trump has caused unease in Central and Eastern Europe nations that he might sacrifice their security needs at a time they are especially fearful of Russia.

Linas Linkevicius of Lithuania says some of Trump's statements have been "confusing" but says he's not jumping to any conclusions.

12:45 p.m.

Former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, are departing Washington.

The Obamas held hands as they walked to a military helicopter parked outside the East Front of the Capitol after Donald Trump took the oath of office.

Donald Trump and first lady Melania (meh-LAH'-nee-ah) Trump escorted the Obamas, and then the couples exchanges small talk and handshakes.

The helicopter is heading to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, where Obama will address staff and supporters before he and his wife fly to California for a vacation.

The Obamas will return to Washington where they will live while their youngest daughter will finish school.

12:39 p.m.

Pope Francis has congratulated Donald Trump on his inauguration and urged the new U.S. president to show concern for the poor, the outcast and those in need who "stand before our door."

Francis says in a message that he's praying Trump's decisions will be guided by the "rich spiritual and ethical values" that have shaped America's history.

The pope also offers these words: "Under your leadership, may America's stature continue to be measured above all by its concern for the poor, the outcast and those in need."

12:36 p.m.

Donald Trump has closed his first speech as president with his campaign slogan: "Make America great again."

Trump is borrowing from his campaign speeches and promising this: "Together we will make America strong again," wealthy again, strong again and proud again.

"And yes," he says, "together, we will make America great again."

12:34 p.m.

Donald Trump says that when Americans open their heart to patriotism, "there is no room for prejudice."

In his inauguration address, Trump is repeating a campaign promise to eradicate "radical Islam" from the face of the earth.

Trump is promising to seek friendship with all nations by reinforcing existing alliances and forming new ones.

12:30 p.m.

President Donald Trump is suggesting that his election will lead to a "new national pride" that will "heal our divisions."

Trump, after beginning his speech with a dark accounting of America, says "the time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action."

Trump suggested that Americans from different backgrounds are united by the same goals and hopes.

He says kids in cities such as Detroit or rural areas like Nebraska "look up at the same sky" and that soldiers of different races "bleed the same red of patriotism."

12:22 p.m.

President Donald Trump says in his inauguration speech that an America united is an America that's "totally unstoppable."

Trump says Americans must speak their minds openly and disagree honestly, but they must always pursue solidarity.

Trump says Americans need not fear -- they're protected by military and law enforcement personnel.

But most importantly, he says, "we will be protected by God."

12:18 p.m.

President Donald Trump says that when Americans open their heart to patriotism, "there is no room for prejudice."

Trump is repeating a campaign promise to eradicate "radical Islam." He says he'll rebuild America's roads, bridges, airports and railways by following "two simple rules: buy American and hire American."

Trump is promising to seek friendship with all nations by reinforcing existing alliances and forming new ones.

12:15 p.m.

In his inauguration speech, President Donald Trump is repeating the dark vision and the list of the country's woes that he hit on during the campaign.

Trump describes closed factories as "tombstones" that dot the county and says the federal government has spent billions defending "other nations' borders while refusing to defend our own."

The Republican president says the U.S. "will confront hardships but we will get the job done."

He says the oath of office he just took "is an oath of allegiance to all Americans" and said that the country will share "one glorious destiny."

12:12 p.m.

President Donald Trump says that he will govern the country by putting America first.

Trump is saying in his first speech as president that "from this day forward, a new vision will govern our hand" and that "from this day forward it's going to be only America first."

Trump says that every decision he makes, on issues from trade to taxes to immigration and foreign affairs will be made to benefit American workers and families.

He says "We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries" taking American jobs.

Trump says that under his leadership, America "will start winning like never before."

12:14 p.m.

President Donald Trump says Americans came by the tens of millions to become part of a historic movement "the likes of which the world has never seen before."

Trump says the United States exists to serve its citizens.

He says Americans want great schools, safe neighborhoods and good jobs.

But he says too many people face a different reality: rusted-out factories, a bad education system, crime, gangs and drugs.

Trump says the "carnage stops right here and right now."

12:10 p.m.

President Donald Trump is declaring his victory a victory for working people.

Trump says in his inauguration speech: "Today we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another," but "transferring power from Washington D.C. and giving it back to you, the people"

Trump says that, for too long, too few have had power and the people have paid the price.

He says: "Washington flourished but the people did not share in its wealth. Politicians prospered but the jobs left and the factories closed."

He says, "That all changes starting right here and right now."

Trump is also thanking former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama for their "gracious" aid through the transition.

12:09 p.m.

President Donald Trump says change starts "right here and right now."

The new president is using his inaugural address to say it doesn't matter which party controls the government. He says that what matters is "whether our government is controlled by the people."

Trump says the forgotten men and women of the country "will be forgotten no longer."

12:05 p.m.

President Donald Trump is beginning his inaugural address by saying that "together we will determine the course of America and the world for many, many years to come."

He says Americans have "joined a great national effort to build our country and restore its promise for all people."

It began to rain in Washington as Trump started speaking.

Trump also thanked all of the past presidents in attendance, including former campaign foes Barack Obama and Bill Clinton.

12 p.m.

Donald Trump is now the 45th president of the United States. He's just taken the oath of office on the West Front of the Capitol.

The combative billionaire businessman and television celebrity won election in November over Democrat Hillary Clinton, and today he's leading a profoundly divided country -- one that's split between Americans enthralled and horrified by his victory.

The unorthodox politician and the Republican-controlled Congress are already charting a newly conservative course for the nation. And they're promising to reverse the work of the 44th president, Barack Obama.

Up next is Trump's inaugural address -- where the new commander in chief is expected to set out his vision for the country's next four years.

11:55 a.m.

Mike Pence has been sworn in as the vice president of the United States.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administered the oath of office.

President-elect Donald Trump chose Pence, the former governor of Indiana, as his running mate last summer.

11:45 a.m.

U.S. embassies and consulates in at least 10 nations in Asia, Europe and Latin America are warning of potentially violent protests through the weekend against the inauguration of Donald Trump as U.S. president.

Security notices posted by U.S. diplomatic missions in Chile, Denmark, France, Greece, Haiti, Italy the Netherlands, Paraguay, Portugal and the Philippines advise American in those countries to steer clear of embassies and consulates on Friday and, in some cases, on Saturday and Sunday. That's due to the possibility of unrest and clashes with police.

The notices say the planned demonstrations are either focused on "U.S. politics" or are "inauguration-related."

11:32 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump has taken the stage for his inauguration.

The Republican businessman from New York flashed a thumbs-up to the crowd as he was introduced.

Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence took the stage at the Capitol minutes after President Barack Obama and members of his family and administration.

Trump will soon be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

11:30 a.m.

Hundreds of people who worked for President Barack Obama are arriving at Andrews Air Force Base to hear some final parting words from the soon-to-be ex-president.

Hours before Obama was to speak, former White House and administration staffers are gathering in a hangar where a small stage with a lone American flag was set up for him.

Obama and his wife, Michelle, are leaving the Capitol by military helicopter after witnessing Donald Trump's swearing-in, and they're being flown to the base in Maryland just outside Washington.

The Obamas will vacation in Palm Springs, California.

11:25 a.m.

The dais is filled for the inauguration on the West Front of the Capitol.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden have taken their seats.

And President-elect Donald Trump's family is ready.

The stage is set for Donald Trump to be sworn in as the next president of the United States.


11:20 a.m.

In the crowd gathered on the National Mall for the inauguration, there's no shortage of fans of Democratic figures.

Big cheers went up when images were shown of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who ran for president against Hillary Clinton. But the biggest cheer so far for a Democrat has gone to first lady Michelle Obama. She received sustained applause as people watched her appear on the television screens.

11:15 a.m.

As Donald Trump and President Barack Obama made their way to the Capitol, police were confronting a group of demonstrators wearing black in downtown Washington and using what appeared to be pepper spray.

Protesters were carrying signs denouncing capitalism and Trump.

Police cordoned off about 100 demonstrators who chanted "hands up, don't shoot."

A helicopter hovered overhead.

11:10 a.m.

President Barack Obama and his successor, Donald Trump, have arrived at the Capitol for Trump's swearing-in ceremony.

Trump is joined by his family, including his five children Eric, Don Jr., Ivanka, Tiffany and youngest son, Barron.

11:05 a.m.

Incoming first lady Melania (meh-LAH'-nee-ah) Trump is wearing a sky blue cashmere jacket and mock turtleneck combination by Ralph Lauren for Inauguration Day.

In a statement, the Lauren Corp. says: "It was important to us to uphold and celebrate the tradition of creating iconic American style for this moment."

Mrs. Trump's hair is in a soft updo and accessorized with long suede gloves and matching stilettos. She was greeted at the White House by President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama. Mrs. Obama was wearing red, short-sleeve dress.

Ivanka Trump chose Oscar de la Renta, and Hillary Clinton showed up in a white Ralph Lauren pantsuit that harkened back to the one she wore to accept the Democratic nomination for president at her party's convention in July. Her jacket matched.

Who else made a large fashion statement for Trump's big day?

Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway wore a military-style wool coat by Gucci of red, white and blue, with two rows of cat-head buttons and a matching red cloche hat. She described her look as "Trump revolutionary wear."

11 a.m

President Barack Obama's departing White House staff is offering a subtle message on the walls of their lower press office as he leaves office.

Obama aides left up on a wall printed front pages from some of Obama's biggest moments, including his 2009 inaugural, his signing of his health care law and the death of Osama bin Laden.

The wall typically features the day's front pages. The compilation of Obama front pages was put up about a week ago.

Obama's press offices were largely emptied out when Trump arrived at the White House for tea with the outgoing president.

It was unclear whether the front pages will still be there when Trump's team arrives. A cleaning crew was expected to prepare the premises for the incoming administration.

10:55 a.m.

Hillary Clinton says she's attending Donald Trump's inauguration to "honor our democracy."

Clinton made the comment on Twitter Trump took the oath of office. Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton are both in attendance.

Here's what Clinton is saying: "I'm here today to honor our democracy & its enduring values. I will never stop believing in our country & its future."

10:50 a.m.

President Barack Obama and his successor, Donald Trump, are departing the White House to head to Trump's inauguration.

The pair got into a limousine that will take them to the Capitol.

Also on their way are Vice President Joe Biden, first lady Michelle Obama and Trump's wife, Melania.

10:35 a.m.

Crowds on the National Mall -- where people without tickets can watch the inauguration -- are growing steadily.

But less than two hours before the swearing-in, there are still wide swaths of empty space. There are strong suggestions that the crowds will not match President Barack Obama's first inaugural eight years ago.

Some people were prevented by security barriers from getting closer to the Capitol despite having plenty of space in front of them.

The grass on the Mall was protected by white plastic and there were some muddy spots amid intermittent rain.

10:33 a.m.

Most of the Donald Trump backers who are walking to the inauguration past Union Station in Washington are trying to ignore protesters outside the train station.

Then there's Doug Rahm, who engaged in a lengthy and sometimes profane yelling match with protesters.

"Get a job," Rahm said. "Stop crying snowflakes, Trump won."

Rahm -- who's from Philadelphia and does high-rise restorations, is with Bikers for Trump. He says the protesters should get behind the new president.

He says, "This is unite America day."

10:30 a.m.

Hillary Clinton has arrived for the inauguration of the man who defeated her in a bitter presidential contest.

Clinton is at the Capitol with her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

Trump and Clinton were last face to face at a charity dinner in New York in October.

The Democratic nominee and former secretary of state waved to reporters when she arrived for the ceremony on Friday morning, but she's not answering questions.

Trump viciously attacked Clinton throughout the campaign and his pledge to incarcerate her led to "Lock her up!" chants becoming a staple at his rallies.

After the election, Trump appeared to back off that threat.

10:25 a.m.

President Barack Obama has left a letter for his successor in the Oval Office before departing the White House -- as is the tradition from one president to the next.

The White House is providing no details about what Obama conveyed to Donald Trump.

Obama campaigned vigorously against Trump. But the president and president-elect have had regular phone conversations since the election, with the president offering guidance and advice.

10:20 a.m.

Belgium's prime minister Donald Trump will uphold NATO's security guarantees and live up to the expectations of the American people.

Charles Michel says in a statement before Trump takes the oath of office that "it is essential that our engagement is maintained" to guarantee peace and stability through NATO.

Trump has called NATO "obsolete" and says European members aren't paying their fair share.

Michel's statement contains no congratulations. He does say "the expectations of the American people are high" and hopes Trump "will be able to deliver."

Michel also says the European Union is entering a new era and it's his belief "that Europe more than ever needs to defend its own agenda and interests."

10:15 a.m.

A high-profile Republican congressman says he would have attended the inauguration if Democrat Hillary Clinton won the election.

But Utah's Jason Chaffetz -- a persistent Clinton investigator -- says he would have been thinking: "Here we go again. I'd be so distraught."

He also says, "It was never an easy or predictable path to the White House, but here's Donald Trump."

More than 50 House Democrats are planning to boycott the ceremony. Some are citing Trump's criticism of John Lewis, the Georgia congressman and civil rights leader who's questioned Trump's legitimacy to be the next president.

10:05 a.m.

The White House says members of the residence staff have presented President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama with two American flags that were flown atop the building.

One of the flags was flown on the first day of Obama's presidency. The other was flown on his final morning as president.

The Obamas are preparing to depart the White House for the last time as president and first lady when they head to Donald Trump's inauguration.

9:55 a.m.

President Barack Obama and the first lady Michelle Obama are welcoming President-elect Donald Trump and his wife, Melania (meh-LAH'-nee-ah), to the White House.

The Obamas have greeted the Trumps at the grand North Portico, the column-lined entrance facing Pennsylvania Avenue.

Obama told Trump that it was good to see him. They exchanged pleasantries, and Melania Trump brought a gift for Michelle Obama.

Melania Trump initially reached to shake Michelle Obama's hand, but the first lady instead gave her a hug.

The families will have coffee and tea at a reception that's closed to the media.

9:45 a.m.

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are asking the public to help them develop projects for his new presidential center on Chicago's South Side.

The Obamas are starting up a foundation website -- Obama.org -- in the hours before Donald Trump is inaugurated the 45th president.

Obama says the foundation's projects will be developed "all over the city, the country and the world." He asks Americans to "tell us what you want this project to be and tell us what's on your mind."

The foundation is developing Obama's presidential library and center in Chicago.

9:40 a.m.

Donald Trump is heading to the White House to meet with President Barack Obama.

Trump has left St. John's Church across from the White House. He paused to shake hands with a clergy member at the door and then walked to his waiting vehicle.

There were cheers from supporters as Trump left the church.

He was followed by family members and Vice President-elect Mike Pence. Pence said he was "very humbled" when he was asked about his message for the day.

9:35 a.m.

President Barack Obama is taking a final stroll from the Oval Office through the Rose Garden as a sitting president. He's soon to welcome his successor, Donald Trump, to the White House.

Obama was seen leaving papers on his desk in the Oval Office. He's told reporters he's feeling nostalgic on his final day as president.

He says his final message to the American people is "thank you."

9:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama is bidding farewell on Twitter.

Here's what it says on the official presidential account: "It's been the honor of my life to serve you."

The president has been striking an optimistic tone in the final days of his administration.

He tells followers that he's "still asking you to believe - not in my ability to bring about change, but in yours."

The president is also asking people to share their thoughts about the focus of his new foundation's work.

He says: "I won't stop; I'll be right there with you as a citizen, inspired by your voices of truth and justice, good humor, and love."

9:25 a.m.

Donald Trump will soon have a new home -- the White House.

But what about another property just down Pennsylvania Avenue: the hotel he leases from the federal government at the Old Post Office building.

The contract with the General Services Administration bars elected officials from benefiting from it. Yet Trump hasn't said he's divested from the hotel -- and he hasn't tried to alter the contract.

House Democrats say GSA officials told them that Trump would violate the contract the moment he takes office. The GSA has said publicly it won't weigh in on the matter until after Trump's in office.

9:20 a.m.

Protesters are trying to block access to security checkpoints across Washington to prevent spectators from making to Donald Trump's inauguration festivities.

But so far, they're not having too much success.

At one checkpoint a line of protesters are chanting "this checkpoint is closed" but a video of the scene posted online shows people going around them.

Police are directing people to walk around the lines of protesters.

The Washington Post is quoting a Washington police officer by name and saying one checkpoint was shut down at 8:30 a.m. due to protesters.

9:15 a.m.

Moscow is hoping for better ties with the United States, and Russian officials and lawmakers are welcoming Donald Trump's inauguration as the start of a potential new chapter.

In Moscow and other Russian cities, people have gathered at parties to celebrate Trump's impending ascension to power.

Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev says that while Trump's policy toward Russia is unclear yet, "we are hoping that reason will prevail."

Medvedev says on Facebook: "We are ready to do our share of the work in order to improve the relationship."

9:10 a.m.

About 100 protesters are attempting to block a gate near the inaugural parade route in Washington.

They're calling for a response to climate change and they're holding signs that say "Resist Trump, climate justice now."

There are also chants of "This is what democracy looks like!"

Police are keeping a lane open for ticket holders to get through.
 

9:05 a.m.

House Democrats will wear special buttons at Donald Trump's inauguration as a silent protest of Republican efforts to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law.

The blue buttons say #protectourcare. That's a Twitter hashtag that some advocacy groups have been using to rally support for the law.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has asked Democrats to show solidarity at the swearing-in and wear the buttons.

More than 50 House Democrats plan to boycott the ceremony. Some are citing Trump's criticism of John Lewis, the Georgia congressman and civil rights leader who's questioned Trump's legitimacy to be the next president.

8:55 a.m.

Donald Trump says his inauguration will have "an unbelievable, perhaps record-setting turnout." Organizers of a protest the next day say their event will be the biggest demonstration in history to welcome a new president.

But how many people will show up at those gatherings? That's a question that may never be answered satisfactorily.

There won't be an official tally at Friday's inaugural festivities or the Women's March on Washington on Saturday.

For decades, the National Park Service provided official crowd estimates for gatherings on the National Mall.

But the agency stopped providing counts after organizers at 1995's Million Man March threatened a lawsuit. They complained that the National Park Service undercounted attendance at the march.

8:50 a.m.

It was still dark when Jeff McNeely and Rob Wyatt woke up and caught an early train to Washington for Donald Trump's inauguration.

The political activists from North Carolina say they supported Trump from early on and wanted to witness the historic day in person.

McNeely calls Trump's victory over Democrat Hillary Clinton "the greatest political upset of all time."

Wyatt wants Americans to give Trump "the opportunity to learn." Wyatt says Trump's "going to make mistakes," but he also says, "so has every president we've had."

8:45 a.m.

Actor Matthew McConaughey says the American people need to "embrace" the fact that Donald Trump won the election and make the best of the next four years.

The movie star says Americans need to "shake hands with the fact that this is happening and it's going down."

McConaughey is in London promoting two new movies and says he's planning to watch the swearing-in live.

He's predicting that "it's going to be a dynamic four years."

8:40 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump has emerged from Blair House to start the Inauguration Day festivities.

Trump and his wife, Melania, stepped out of the government guest house next to the White House just after 8:30 a.m. and took a motorcade for the short drive to St. John's Episcopal Church. A light rain is falling.

After the service, they'll head to the White House to be greeted by President Barack Obama.

8:35 a.m.

Members of President-elect Donald Trump's team are starting to arrive as Inauguration Day festivities get underway.

Incoming White House chief of staff Reince Priebus arrived shortly after 8 a.m. at Blair House -- the government guest house across from the White House. It's where Trump stayed on his final night before becoming president.

Also seen arriving are senior adviser and former campaign manager Kellyanne Conway and communications aide Hope Hicks.

Trump's motorcade is waiting for him outside Blair House. He'll soon go to a nearby church, St. John's Episcopal Church, for a prayer service.

7:30 a.m.

President-elect Donald Trump is starting inaugural day off with a tweet, saying "It all begins today!"

Trump also says: "I will see you at 11:00 A.M. for the swearing-in. THE MOVEMENT CONTINUES - THE WORK BEGINS!"

Trump and his wife Melania will begin their day at St. John's Episcopal Church, located across Lafayette Park from the White House. They'll then meet with President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at the White House before joining them for the trip to the Capitol for the swearing-in ceremony.

7:25 a.m.

It's still early in Washington on Inauguration Day, but the protesters who vowed to keep guests with tickets from watching Donald Trump take the oath of office aren't having much luck.

Dozens of protesters are lined up at the "blue gate" entrance to a seating area on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol, holding signs that read "Free Palestine" and "Let Freedom ring." Some are wearing orange jumpsuits with black hoods over their faces, protesting U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay.

But police are behind the protesters, allowing those with tickets to make their way through the gate. On the other side of the Capitol, things are quiet and orderly at the "orange gate."

Eleanor Goldfield helped organize the (hash)DisruptJ20 protests. At the "blue gate," she says they want to show Trump and his supporters that they will not be silent throughout his presidency. She calls Trump supporters "misguided, misinformed or just plain dangerous."

7:15 a.m.

Kevin Puchalski is a 24-year-old construction worker who drove to Washington from Philadelphia with two friends to see Donald Trump's inauguration as the next president.

He says that while Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton had much more support than Trump in his hometown, he attended a Trump rally in rural Pennsylvania and "it was fantastic."

He says, "I'm here for history. This is the first president that I voted for that won."

Trump's victory in Pennsylvania was key to his Electoral College win over Clinton. The state had voted for the Democratic nominee in the previous six presidential elections.

Puchalski says his main hope for Trump is that he fulfills his promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border. He says, "The wall. Honestly, that is true. The wall. Keep the illegals out."

7 a.m.

It's not just voters from across the country visiting Washington to celebrate the inauguration of Donald Trump.

On the eve of the inauguration, Brexit leader Nigel Farage toasted the president-elect at a reception on the top floor of a hotel overlooking the White House.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant joined him on Thursday night, describing himself as the matchmaker between Trump and Farage.

Farage noted that in 2016, British voters chose to leave the European Union and American voters picked Trump. It said it would be a year remembered as a pivot point in history, and the crowd of lobbyists, Trump boosters and British political and media figures cheered.

Farage said he agreed with Trump's assessment of himself as "Mr. Brexit plus-plus-plus." He added that Trump is "the only person I've ever met in my life who makes me feel like an introvert."

6:45 a.m.

Before dawn on Inauguration Day in Washington, only a few lights were at the White House residence, where President Barack Obama and his family have lived for the past eight years.

Klieg lights brightened the viewing stand from which incoming President Donald Trump will view the parade route later in the day.

Trump and his family were spending the night at Blair House, just across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House.

Lafayette Square outside the White House was fenced off with large metal barriers and security lines moved briskly to let outgoing White House staff and members of the media into the White House complex early in the morning.

6:35 a.m.

Americans eager to see the Donald Trump take the oath of office as the nation's next president are starting to make their way through downtown Washington and onto the National Mall.

Dump trucks, police cars and National Guard soldiers and Washington D.C. police are manning street corners in the city's downtown, blocking vehicle access for blocks around the Mall.

But there's plenty of room on the sidewalks for those clutching engraved tickets for a seat to Trump's inauguration, as well as those without who plan to watch from spots between the Capitol and the Washington monument.

The "red gate" ticket entrance opened to cheers before dawn from those who are braving the cold and waiting in line in the city's East End neighborhood. Some in the crowd began a chant of "USA!" Others picked up "Make America Great Again" hats and other Trump gear from street vendors.   

3 a.m.

Donald Trump upended American politics and energized voters angry with Washington, and now the real estate mogul and reality television star will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

Republicans will be in control of the White House for the first time in eight years.

Ebullient Trump supporters have flocked to the nation's capital for the inaugural festivities, some wearing red hats emblazoned with his "Make America Great Again" campaign slogan.

The president-in-waiting will attend church with his family Friday morning, then meet President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for tea at the White House. The Trumps and the Obamas will travel together in the presidential limousine for the short trip to the Capitol for the noon swearing-in ceremony.

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