Crews blow up 'highly volatile' chemicals that remained in Beave - WAOW - Newsline 9, Wausau News, Weather, Sports

Crews blow up 'highly volatile' chemicals that remained in Beaver Dam apartment

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WISN-TV WISN-TV
DODGE COUNTY, Wis. (WISN) -

The chemicals found in a Beaver Dam apartment unit were so dangerous that they could not be removed and needed to be detonated by experts.

The explosion at the Village Glen Apartments came at about 1:30 p.m.

The "significant amount of highly volatile homemade explosives" police chief John Kreuziger described were found after a Monday afternoon explosion that left one man dead and displaced about 150 residents.

"We are doing everything possible to minimize damage to the units and surrounding properties," Kreuziger said.

Victim specialists have been working with all of the displaced families, in some cases reuniting them with pets that were left behind, he said.

The identity of the man who died remains publicly unknown, and the investigation into why he had the chemicals in the apartment remains "very active," Kreuziger said.

Another press briefing was scheduled for 4 p.m. Wednesday.

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The chemicals found in a Beaver Dam apartment unit are so dangerous that they cannot be removed and will be detonated later Wednesday, police chief John Kreuziger said at a morning news conference.

The "significant amount of highly-volatile homemade explosives" Kreuziger described were found after a Monday afternoon explosion at the Village Glen Apartments that left one man dead and displaced about 150 residents.

"We are doing everything possible to minimize damage to the units and surrounding properties," Kreuziger said.

Victim specialists have been working with all of the displaced families, in some cases reuniting them with pets that were left behind, he said.

RELATED: 'This is not a meth lab:' Bomb-making chemicals found after Beaver Dam apartment blast

Affected residents were told to gather at a church at 408 South Spring Street at 11:30 a.m. for a meeting with officials.

The identity of the man who died remains publicly unknown, and the investigation into why he had the chemicals in the apartment remains "very active," Kreuziger said.

Another press briefing was scheduled for 4 p.m. Wednesday.

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