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WISCONSIN PROUD: McDill Elementary student honored for saving mother's life

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Avelynn Smith

The McDill Elementary student Avelynn Smith saved her mother's life, and she credits what she's learned from watching her dad handle the situation in the past.

Avelynn Smith is just nine years old but being the daughter of someone who suffers from seizures has made her extra aware of how to handle an emergency.

TOWN OF WHITING, Wis. (WAOW) — Avelynn Smith is just nine years old but being the daughter of someone who suffers from seizures has made her extra aware of how to handle an emergency.


The McDill Elementary student saved her mother's life, and she credits what she's learned from watching her dad handle the situation in the past.

While the family was watching a movie, Avelynn's mother, Brianna Davis, began to seize, ultimately hitting her head on the floor.

With no hesitation or panic, she picked up the phone and called 911.

"We don't usually get a lot of real 911 calls from children, so this was an anomaly," said Beth Gadow, Portage County Sheriff communications technician who praised Smith repeatedly for her actions.

"I mean, Avelynn did such an amazing job. She knew all the answers to all the questions, more than a lot of adults that call. She was calm, cool and collected. She gave her address right away, then I said '"OK, what's going on?'" and she said my mom is having a seizure, so flat out from the beginning we knew what kind of call it was and what help we needed to send."

Davis says her seizures have always been something she tried to hide from her kids, but now, could not be more thankful to have them by her side.

"I started having them when I was in my 20s," Davis said. "I never wanted my kids to see, and now my children are both pros and I'm very proud of my daughter."

In addition to her daughter's heroics, Davis credits her recovery to the quick response time and care provided by first responders. But emergency services say all the credit should go to Avelynn, whose knowledge and calm demeanor allowed them to do their job to the best of their ability.
Even though Avelynn was the one receiving the award, she made sure to credit her four-year-old brother for his contributions, saying he was lying next to his mom, rubbing her back, and telling her everything will be okay.

Even if you have no health issues, Davis encourages everyone with kids to teach them how to handle emergencies. Davis added, kids are often more capable than people give them credit for.

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