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AP
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New state data shows hunters killed almost 8% fewer deer during this year's nine-day gun season than in 2020. The Department of Natural Resources released preliminary numbers Tuesday showing hunters killed 175,667 deer, down from 190,646 last year. The number of buck's killed declined 1.3% while the antlerless numbers dropped 13%. The northern forest was the only one of the state's four management zones where hunters killed more deer than in 2020, up 9.3%. The DNR had sold 564,440 licenses authorizing hunters to kill a deer with a gun during any of the state's 2021 deer seasons as of Sunday. That's down about 0.8% from last year.

AP
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Children’s Wisconsin said seven patients injured in last weekend’s Christmas parade crash in suburban Milwaukee are still being treated at the hospital. The facility originally received 16 patients after the driver of a red SUV roared through the parade in Waukesha, killing six people and injuring more than 60. One Children's Wisconsin patient was released on Sunday, another on Friday and another was able to come home for Thanksgiving. Out of the seven remaining patients, four are in serious condition, two are in fair condition and one is in good condition. Darnell Brooks Jr. is accused of speeding away from police and entering the parade, refusing to stop even as an officer banged on the hood of his SUV. Five adults and one child were killed in the crash. 

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On this year’s Black Friday, things almost seem normal. Malls and stores report decent-sized crowds, if not the floods of people that used to fight over the latest toys and electronics. Online shopping is much too common for that now, and big discounts are spread out over the weeks leading up to Christmas, on both websites and in stores. But out-of-stock items due to supply crunches, higher prices for gas and food, and labor shortages that make it more difficult to respond to customers are also causing frustrations for shoppers.

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The world is confronting a new coronavirus variant, and officials have named it “omicron." A World Health Organization panel has classified it as a highly transmissible virus of concern. Its discovery in southern Africa sent a chill through much of the world as nations raced to halt air travel, markets fell sharply and scientists held emergency meetings. The overall risks of omicron are not yet known. But the 27-nation European Union and some other countries quickly suspended air travel from southern Africa and stepped up other precautions.

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Stocks are opening sharply lower on Wall Street Friday after South Africa found a fast-spreading coronavirus variant and the European Union proposed suspending air travel from southern Africa. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped more than 900 points in the first 20 minutes of trading. The S&P 500 index was down 1.7%, on pace for its worst day since late September and the Nasdaq composite is also dropping. Travel and energy stocks are among the biggest losers, with Royal Caribbean, Carnival and Norwegian Cruises all off about 10%. The New York Stock exchange closes early at 1 p.m. Eastern.  

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South African scientists have identified a new version of the coronavirus this week that they say is behind a recent spike in COVID-19 infections in Gauteng, the country’s most populous province. It’s unclear from where the new variant actually arose, but it was first detected by scientists in South Africa and has also been seen in travelers to Hong Kong and Botswana. Health minister Joe Phaahla said the variant was linked to an “exponential rise” of cases in the last few days, although experts are still trying to determine if the new variant is actually responsible. The World Health Organization has convened a technical group of experts to decide whether the new variant warrants being designated a variant of interest or a variant of concern.

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Giant balloons once again wafted through miles of Manhattan, high school and college marching bands from around the country were back, and so were the crowds at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

AP
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Wisconsin kicked off its 170th deer gun season and for the second straight year some hunters were feeling ill-equipped. A nationwide ammunition shortage due to the supply chain issues affecting other products has left hunters searching far and wide for ammo in the first place and then shelling out more money if they do find it. Randy and Tiffani Rogness, who own Paddock Lake Sporting Goods in Salem, had empty ammunition shelves on Friday. When a new supply is delivered it lasts two to three hours, even at one box limit per customer. One of the nation’s biggest ammunition manufacturers, Vista Outdoor in Anoka, Minnesota, said it’s “ramping production ahead of schedule at its Remington facility to meet unprecedented demand.”