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Some very cool views of Earth from space

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Ocean near Bahamas

GMT306_14_06_Shane Kimbrough_1007_STL ATL Trilith KSC Bahamas Santo Domingo

If you enjoy seeing the Earth in new ways, be sure to take a few minutes to explore NASA's website (www.nasa.gov).  If you go to the galleries tab on the top you will have access to some amazing views from spacecraft, satellites, and so on.  Below you will find a few recent entries to their files.

Dec 6, 2021
 

Eclipse Over Antarctica

Earth from 1.5 million kilometers during the total solar eclipse visible in Antarctica on December 4th, 2021.

This image of our home planet shows how Earth looked from more than 950,000 miles, or 1.5 million kilometers, away during the total solar eclipse visible in Antarctica on Dec. 4, 2021. The EPIC instrument on the DSCOVR spacecraft captured the eclipse's umbra, the dark, inner shadow of planet Earth. Shaped like a cone extending into space, it has a circular cross section most easily seen during an eclipse.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 6, 2021
Editor: Yvette Smith
Nov 16, 2021
 

Observing Earth from the Space Station

image of the ocean

As the International Space Station orbits the Earth, the crew makes observations of the universe and our home planet. This image taken from the space station shows the blue-green waters around the Bahamas, as shown in Space Station highlights for the week of Nov. 8, 2021.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Nov 16, 2021
Editor: Yvette Smith
Nov 7, 2021
 

Particles From the Sun Produce Light Show on Earth

The aurora borealis glow on the northern horizon while stars wheel overhead in this long exposure, taken near the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on Nov. 4, 2021.

The aurora borealis glow on the northern horizon while stars wheel overhead in this long exposure, taken near the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on Nov. 4, 2021. Sky watchers in many locations were treated to unusually intense light displays, thanks to a geomagnetic storm created when multiple coronal mass ejections (CMEs) of charged particles from the Sun interacted with Earth’s magnetic field. 

Image credit: NASA/ Bill Dunford

Last Updated: Nov 8, 2021
Editor: Michael Bock
 
 

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